The Real Presence in the Eucharist Part A cont’d: The Council of Trent Anathemas—then

God’s WORD

    “But though we, or an angel from heaven, preach any other gospel unto you than that which we have preached unto you, let him be accursed.

    “As we said before, so say I now again, If any man preach any other gospel unto you than that ye have received, let him be accursed.”—Galatians 1:8, 9

    “Not rendering evil for evil, or railing for railing: but contrariwise blessing; knowing that ye are thereunto called, that ye should inherit a blessing.”—1 Peter 3:9

    “And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell.”—Matthew 10:28

Note: This list is very abbreviated as are the biographies. There is much more to the story of these godly men who believed God’s Word and did not render evil for evil.

A few who were killed because they would not believe Jesus’ real body and blood were in the Eucharist

John Badby, a tailor and layman March 1409
“…they demanded of him what he believed about the bread. John answered that it was hallowed bread, and not God’s body. A tun (beer cask) was put over him, and a fire set.

And when he felt the fire, he cried, Mercy! calling belike upon the Lord. The prince immediately commanded to take away the tun, and quench the fire and asked him if he would forsake heresy, to take him to the faith of holy church…

When Mr. Badby refused, the prince commanded him straight to be put again into the pipe or tun…

Illustration of the horrible burning of John Badby.

John Oldcastle, Lollard leader 1417
“…Oldcastle…insisted the bread was still bread (did not become the literal body of Christ)…

[Oldcastle was] condemned as heretic for denying transubstantiation and “hung and burnt hanging” in St Giles’s Fields, London, 1417. Wood engraving.

Six Articles Act of 1539 in England revived death by burning as a penalty for denying transubstantiation.
Because of this act many, often quite humble folk were tried by Church courts and tried according to whether they believed the wafer used in the Mass was changed in substance at its consecration into Christ Himself bodily. If they said the host and wine were NOT the real Jesus, they were burnt alive…

John Rogers 1555
“I was asked whether I believed in the sacrament to be the very body and blood of our Savior, Christ, that was born of the Virgin Mary and hanged on the cross really and substantially.

I answered, ‘I think it could be false. I cannot understand really and substantially to signify otherwise then corporeally, but corporeally Christ is only in heaven and so Christ cannot be corporeally in your sacrament.’ And therefore he was condemned and burned.”—John Rogers, from Foxe’s book of Martyrs.

Dr. Rowland Taylor, a pastor 1555
“My second cause why I was condemned an heretic is, that I denied Transubstantiation and Concomitation (meaning-that the bread/wine body/blood of Christ literally coexist together with one another at the
same time),

“two juggling words of the papists, by the which they do believe, and will compel all other to believe, that Christ’s natural body is made of bread, and the Godhead by and by to be joined thereunto;

“so that immediately after the words called ‘the words of consecration,’ there is no more bread and wine in the sacrament, but the substance only of the body and blood of Christ together with his Godhead…

“This matter was not long debated in words: but because I denied the aforesaid papistical doctrine (yea rather, plain, most wicked, idolatry, blasphemy and heresy), I was judged a heretic.

“I did also affirm the pope to be antichrist, and popery antichristianity. And
I confessed the doctrine of the Bible to be sufficient doctrine, touching all and singular matters of Christian religion, and of salvation.”—Dr. Taylor

Dr. Rowland Taylor was convicted and burned at the stake for heresy.

Derek Carver of Brighton July 22, 1555
“Ye think ye can make a God. Ye make a pudding.” He said this at his trial in St Mary’s Church-Over-the-Water. Derek was burnt at Lewes on 22nd July 1555.

William Wolsey and Robert Piggot, October 16, 1555
“The sacrament of the altar was an idol and the natural body and blood of Christ were not present in the said sacrament and to this opinion they said they would stick, believing the same to be no heresy, that they had affirmed but the very truth, whereupon they would stand.”

They were burnt at Ely, Cambridgeshire on 16th October 1555.

Nicholas Ridley, English clergyman, died 1555
“White told Ridley that he had been condemned as a heretic…for denying the Real Presence, that there could be no further argument about this, and that unless Ridley recanted he would be condemned and burned as a heretic; but he urged Ridley to acknowledge Papal Supremacy and the Real Presence, and told him that the queen would pardon him if he recanted.

“Ridley refused to recant, denounced both Papal Supremacy and the Real Presence, and asked to be allowed to address the court and justify his attitude.”

“Ridley spoke a bit, but then was forced to quit speaking and White condemned Ridley as a heretic…

“Ridley…denied that the sacrament of the altar (Eucharist) was the true and natural body and blood of Christ, and said that after the words of consecration, it was really bread and wine which remained. For this, Ridley was condemned and burned.”—Bloody Mary’s Martyrs: The Story of England’s Terror
by Jasper Ridley p. 113

Maerten Janss, Corn Porter,
Jan Hendrickss of Swartewael, Steersman, February 5, 1572

“Both men were condemned to death with fire by the judges of the city of Delft…

“They also hold very evil views concerning the mass, despising and utterly rejecting the holy sacrament of the altar…”

Maerten and Jan were “to be led upon the scaffold erected in the marketplace of this city, and there to be tied to a stake and burned till death ensues…

“We furthermore declare all their property confiscated and forfeited for the benefit of his royal majesty…

“Done the fifth of February, A. D. 1572, Delft Style.”
—Extracted from the first book of criminal sentences, fol. 195, preserved in the archives of the city of Delft, 23d of August, A. D. 1659.

George Bucker, also called Adam Damlip,
was drawn, hanged and quartered for his preaching against transubstantiation and the propitiatory sacrifice of the mass.

God’s WORD

    “O LORD of hosts, blessed is the man that trusteth in thee.”
    —Psalm 84:12

    “Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather give place unto wrath: for it is written, Vengeance is mine; I will repay, saith the Lord.”—Romans 12:19

    “Seek ye the LORD while he may be found, call ye upon him while he is near:

    “Let the wicked forsake his way, and the unrighteous man his thoughts: and let him return unto the LORD, and he will have mercy upon him; and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon.—Isaiah 55:6, 7

    “I am come a light into the world, that whosoever believeth on me should not abide in darkness.”—John 12:46

The Real Presence in the Eucharist Part 5 B: Council of Trent’s Anathemas—Now

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